30 January 2015

Public Disclosure Missing from NPPD

There is an obvious problem with the Nebraska Power Power District and public disclosure involving the r-project. The company has been and continues to issue edicts or proclamations with basic statements that do not indicate any facts from which decisions are being made.

Some of the most worrisome or egregious examples started when the project was announced and continued even as NPPD wants to encroach on private property.

When the project was first announced, there were three reasons given, yet there has never been any documentary evidence to provide proof of these needs.

Why did NPPD make certain that the line went close to Cherry county where the Cherry County Wind Energy Association wants to develop turbines on public property? Was NPPD aware of the proposed development site and thus wanted to make sure to provide a line nearby so the turbine facility could be developed for personal profit by the turbine farm developer and land-owners?

There was no documentation released on how the route alternative were originally selected.

There was no documentation released on how the final route was selected.

The company will refer to the public hearings where the bureaucrats mostly sat like stone, but they have released nothing in regards to an overall perspective and particulars of those public hearings. For example, of the people in attendance, how many actually spoke in favor of the project? What was indicated by additional written comments? What issues were indicated that perhaps NPPD failed to consider in choosing the final transmission line corridor?

These details should be properly evaluated and a open and unbiased report should be issued for the public to read and study. Yet the company has done no such thing.

NPPD should be sued for release of this information.

NPPD should explain why the route was moved for a few houses but could not be moved a short distance distance to avoid major impacts to three wetland complexes that are habitats for thousands of birds, including swans and threatened and endangered species.

NPPD has not published any details on the additional access routes through the hills where line construction would occur and then be used for eventual maintenance? This is a huge void, yet the company says nothing. No public disclosure here, either.

The public does not want NPPD to go ahead on the r-project until the environmental assessment being done by the Fish and Wildlife Service is finished. Yet an NPPD official says they feel "confident" they can avoid any concerns and proceed without waiting for the review to be completed. Since when is NPPD an environmental organization of any credibility, and how will they achieve this supposed course of action?

Since when has NPPD administrative staff taken the stance that what the FWS has to say doesn't make a difference.

Full speed ahead on the r-project. Perhaps these so-called leaders are expecting to vote themselves a bonus if the project is done according to the proposed schedule?

There seems to be something akin to a "backroom shyster" approach involved. "What we says is the way is has to be. Just believe us because we are right."

There might be considered the "ruling class" and peasants approach ... "you will just go along with what we say."

Or perhaps it might be that the administrative staff of NPPD simply feel they do not have to explain anything to the public in any thorough and suitable manner?

Something needs to be get rid of this sort of administrative perspective from a public utility company, that prefers to pay themselves exorbitant salaries for personal gain so they can destroy grasslands flora and fauna, and flout the concerns of private property owners.

The public is missing in the Nebraska Public Power District name because of their lack of full discourse through open and necessary communication, as required by Nebraska law.

The company should change their name to "Nebraska Administrative Power District."

A similar procedure would likely be used if and when this power line is extended through the sand hills westward from Thedford.

24 January 2015

Three Shorebirds of the Western Sandhills

These are some videos of birds taken in past times that are finally getting moved to a digital format. The audio is ambient so perhaps these are best heard on mute.


video
Marbled Godwit east of Merriman: May 4, 2006
video
Upland Sandpiper at Peter Long Lake: May 5, 2006
video
Long-billed Curlew at Snow Lake: June 12, 2006

Although these were shot in high-definition, when enlarged on the screen this is not apparent. The software is still being learned to achieve the results wanted.

22 January 2015

Educational Raptor Event at UNO

A unique collaborative event brought raptors to the campus of the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

The featured birds were a Barred Owl (named Nahi), an American kestrel (Abilena) and a Broad-winged Hawk (Chinkapin).

Clem Klaphake with Nahi.


Tad Leeper with Abilena.


Michelle Foss with Chinkapin.


Numerous students enjoyed getting up close to the raptors with many cell phone pictures taken by the excited people present.

Volunteers Clem Klaphake and Tad Leeper — who both enjoy teaching others about nature and birds — along with Michelle Foss and Jeanine Lackey of Fontenelle Forest were present to handle the birds and answer the many questions.

The event on Thursday, January 22nd was because of cooperation between The Collaborative at UNO and Fontenelle Forest Raptor Recovery.

The raptor recovery group holds many similar events in Nebraska, with more than 20,000 attendees in 2014. Many volunteers, including a raptor recovery relay team, occur statewide with program efforts extending to Iowa, South Dakota and Colorado. There is a field hospital in Elmwood, Nebr.

"We have had many new educational opportunities since taking over the recovery program," said Brad Watkins, communications director for the Fontenelle Forest Association. There is a monthly "raptors live at the forest," he said. Several display birds dwell in mews along the along the boardwalk east of the nature center in Bellevue, and can be enjoyed by visitors to the forest.

This was certainly the first time there have been birds of prey in the Community Engagement Center on the city campus, and an appreciation for the event was obvious.

20 January 2015

Spirit of the Sandhills

The spirit of the sand hills is crying. Mother Nature's tears abound as the corporate assault continues among the land of the dunes. Whether realized or known, there are multiple efforts degrading those values so essential to the character.

And it is being done primarily for corporations that want more profit, much of coming from no one in their office, but from the land and its people.

Start with the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad. How many tank cars full of hazardous oil are shipped through communities along the sandhills' route? The railroad has apparently not provided any community preparedness tools, yet the residents are the ones in danger. This includes delays residents at train stops. Noises enough to stop a conservation on a home's sidewalk. And the diesel fumes which waft though so many residences.

There could be ten hazardous material derailments and not one would stop Warren Buffet of Berkshire Hathaway, the owner of BNSF, from going down Omaha's Farnam Street in his Cadillac, off to his office to make more money.

Once there were immensely dark skies among the hills. Now little, pestering lights blink incessantly across the sky-scape. More are proposed, so a wireless company such as Verizon can increase its service and profits. If course, all of the towers were built on private property through easement agreements.

Go to any primary hilltop and look about and the extent of lights is insulting.

Powerline desecration is going to worsen. The r-project is actively underway and its western counterpart is already being planned, just because of some opinion by the Nebraska Public Power District. The plans are flawed and numerous ranchers wanting to protect their heritage are basically opposed to losing key values so important to their families and heritage.

The administrators of NPPD make multiple hundreds of thousands of dollars every year.

Ranchers work for thousands of hours to continue a heritage.

It is obvious which view to agree with, though there are some, as indicated in a recent, new issue of a local newspaper: "Have We Lost Our Minds?".

Integral with industrial transmission lines are plans for wind turbines to disgrace the sky. Companies wanting to promote their personal "green agenda" cannot do it without some public subsidy, which is the intention of the Nebraska legislature.

Rookie governor Pete Ricketts wants to export power from Nebraska to elsewhere. Maybe he should have a huge transmission line built to his central Omaha home, and then to the governor mansion. Then install some wind turbines to meet your mission.

There are certainly not any solar panels now on either residence. The same applies to Jeremy Nordquist, another politician from Omaha.

Seekers in Cherry county that own land are also in pursuit of more dough.

Public commentary has been about what someone else should do, and that the state taxpayers should provide a subsidy rather than the company paying its one way.

The disingenuous part of this is that a Canadian corporation wants to build a pipeline, yet Nebraskans have to deal with the reality of massive pipes buried beneath the land they have owned for so long. Heritage ranches are being forced to accept an industrial powerline, based upon corporate bureaucrats sitting on chairs also paid for by someone else.

Plans are already on record for a massive development north of Thedford, in southern Cherry county. It will mean a massive destruction of what is now a grand prairie. The vista from Highway 83, looking west is quite spectacular.

Most ranchers do not get an extra penny to conserve the grass of their hills, which is the resource upon which they make their living. What they do is more significant than anything done by some "fat-cat" powercrat sitting on a chair in some office chair looking for another profit opportunity.

It takes eons for grassland to be created, but it is obliterated in a few hours.

Reducing property taxes is certainly something that the rural land-owners in the sandhills would immediately appreciate.

And when will there be an ongoing initiative to conserve the grand land of the sandy hills of grass, as so appreciated and lately being taken advantage of? Prairie is being plowed to create cropland, watered by pivots sucking from the Ogallala aquifer.

Many people have appreciated memories of their special times within the sandhills. Many others have strived to conserve the special values of the place. Many "big-buck" bureaucrats have thrived on paychecks derived upon the backs of the people. There are essential ways needed to conserve the special values of the sand hills and ensure its long-term survival.

Glimmers are obvious and making an undeniable bit of a difference. There needs to be more because the corporate assault and unending desire for more money in a persons pocket will never end anywhere, including among the sandhills.

P-words Pertinent to the Perpetual Sandhills

The sand hills are a phantasmagorical place of prominent presence and perspective as presented by photographers and other producers of words or other sorts of content they deem of importance.

There are profound challenges to the society of the sand hills.

Planners are underway for an industrial powerline proposed by public power utility powercrats in Nebraska. Pronouncements for some producers of consumptive uses of power impose upon priceless heritage. Corporate profiteers are focused upon personal gain and always, getting paragraphs properly in a corporate report of performance for a period of time.

Hundreds of people want protection and conservation.

It is because of passion that points are being made in protest. Presence is making a difference. Perspective is so vastly important.

Patience is no prerogative in the perseverance to convey personal points to leading to the demise of some indicated place on the land.

These sentiments have been proffered before, but a bit or wordplay can be a pastime, too for a plyboy.

15 January 2015

OPPD Habitat Destruction and Threats to Wildbirds?


This is an email which was sent to the Nebraska Field Office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in order for initiate an investigation of this situation. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has also been asked to clarify the situation at the Mandan Flats, in order to determine if the expectant vegetative clearing will impact the status of the wetlands and brooks on this property owned by the citizens of the City of Omaha.

This is a request that the FWS investigate the continual habitat destruction by the Omaha Public Power District. At least 200 miles of corridor are cleared on an annual basis, and done during all months of the year, according to information provided by the utility.

If there is any vegetation beneath the powerlines during the time when birds are breeding, it is more than likely that there is the potential destruction of bird nests, eggs and young. The clearing effort, as personally seen, involves the nearly complete removal of vegetation. What remains is just the ground cover, with a height of less than an inch. There are several species which appreciate the area of particular concern, the Mandan Flats along the Missouri River, just east of Mandan Park. This is City of Omaha property, owned by the citizens.

This is just a small space of special interest whereas OPPD is so completely involved in removing vegetation on large extents of land.

Any destruction of birds nests, eggs or young is a violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The FWS needs to investigate this situation and make sure there are no violations, or how the public utility is aware of and addressing any potential concerns.

By the way, the state of Nebraska has a somewhat similar law regarding how it is illegal to destroy bird eggs or nests, so perhaps their law enforcement officials should be involved as well?

12 January 2015

Gilded Frosting of a Corporate Cake

It's all about the dough. Mix the right ingredients to a proper consistency, let it rise and then cook a cake at the right temperature, then convey it as a treat which can hardly be denied. Any good recipe can be used again and again to someone's enjoyment. The size of the cake does not matter, because a cover of sweet frosting and showy glitter can be just so special.

There are the basic ingredients. For a chocolate cake, include cups of flour and sugar mixed together, then butter and cooking oil, and cocoa. Don't forget cold water when all are mixed together. These are the basic items given in a "Mom's Kitchen" cookbook of a certain familiarity.

Other items to include may be vanilla, salt and soda, mixed well by a suitable culinary machine. The entire batter needs to be well-mixed to suit the cake pan. Then cook the creation at 400o for twenty minutes. Make sure it does not get overdone!

Once slightly cooled, carefully spread the frosting, covering the entire cake. Then sprinkle about some glitter for decorative reasons ... perhaps because someone decided that the cake just had to have highlights. Candles may be included to give some particular recognition.

These are necessities to bake a cake, once and again, with multiple other sorts of recipes prevalent. The routine is well known.

The result is usually so nice with its special adornments. Perhaps nearly everyone standing around the serving table sings a song of celebration. It may seem like a complete joy, though some nothing is said as they smile. Some have to wait to the candles to be lit and aflame to get involved. Within the last moments as the throng unites in a common cause, others agree. Blow out a candle and the frosting gets new attention.

Then there is the eating. Some people may grab a hearty piece of some size to eat, taking a big bite because that is the way it is. Maybe a lesser portion will suffice. Others might take just a tiny bit of the cake, with lesser frosting, just to be involved. A few folks completely avoid the edible treat, because of they have simply decided not to partake. They will still smile for the occasion to show an appreciation for effort.

Glitter, frosting and candles can be such useless things but as they are atop everything, getting the most attention, so are seemingly most important.

Overall it may be a fine celebration, with the underlying perspective unsaid. Some few understood that the many celebrating are very about being nice while others only applauded, just to be considerate.

How many years has this happened among so many families in Nebraska ... among how many households? This times may be done year after year. Another bunch of candles, and another burst where the frosting once again gets the most attention.

This analogy is meant to convey what happened with the recent pay raises for administrative bureaucrats at the Nebraska Public Power District, which got the largest individual pay raises. Utility customers paid the cost. Some of the customers have probably had a hard time to find the dollars for a monthly bill. Yet. The administrators get bigger and larger paychecks.

It is the workers — the hearty dough of any well made cake — which make the company run, yet the frosting at NPPD get the most attention and make the most from the monetary dole issued as paid for by rate-payers in Nebraska.

The cake is essential, not the frosting or glitter.

Verses for When Walking Around Midtown

Swing low sweet chariot,
Coming just to carry me home
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
Your presence has let me know
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
It's just the right time to go
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
Life's joys and problems are seeming to end
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
Times when efforts were repeated and sown
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
As family memories begin to close
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
With only thoughts of friendly times once known
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
A personal trail is getting dim
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
With a blood flow lessening its ebb
 
Swing low blessed chariot,
Take me to where colorful birds always sing
 
Swing low sweet chariot,
Before going up and away.

Swing low .. swing real low and don't miss as you carry me home.

Swing low blessed chariot. Thank you for a new life within the holy light.

Saturday - January 10, 2015

07 January 2015

Culinary Traditions of Chicago Game Dinners

Unique to wildbird history are the numerous game dinners at Chicago. The tradition started in 1858 with the first festivity at the Tremont House on Sunday in September 5th. Two paragraphs convey the details: "It is an ungracious task to look over the Tremont dinner bill of last Sunday and see how many things we were unable to eat," — Chicago Daily Press and Tribune. Delicacies served, whether roasted or broiled, included blue-winged teal, wild pigeons, mallards, prairie chickens, sand hill cranes, wood cock, plover and reed birds.

About forty people enjoyed the meal and the hospitality of a small but significant gathering.

Undoubtedly, some of the menu items were purchased at the local market. At the time, to purchase prairie chickens it would cost $1.25 to 1.50 per dozen, wholesale price at the city market.

The Tremont House was situated at the southeast corner of Lake and Dearborn Streets. The place initially opened its doors to guests in 1832. A fire meant its demise in 1839. After being rebuilt, it burned again, but once again was recreated.

The first soiree was such a blasting success that it became a must-attend, annual tradition. Prominent in the endeavor was John Burroughs Drake, proprietor and manager of the establishment.

More fine dinners happened, and various historic sources convey details, with some of the menus digitally documented.

The 1866 game dinner was in late November, and a summary of the "bill of fare" was reported by various newspapers, as the "bill of fare" was beyond compare.

"Roast prairie chickens, roast black bear, roast wild turkey, roast saddle venison, roast mallard duck, roast canvas back duck, roast wild goose, roast red-head duck, roast brant, roast wood duck, roast sand-hill crane, roast grey duck, roast partridge, roast teal duck, roast spike tails, broiled quail, broiled plover, broiled snipe, broiled blue-winged teal, broiled shovel bill duck, broiled squirrel, broiled venison steak, broiled rabbit, broiled butter balls."

Late-November wholesale prices at the Chicago market indicate the purchase price of some items on the meal's menu.

  • mallard ducks; 2 dozen were sold for $3.00 per dozen
  • prairie chickens; 10 dozen at $4.25; 10 dozen at $4.50
  • quails; 8 dozen at $3.00; 6 dozen at $2.50
  • wild turkeys; 1 dozen at 20 cents per pound

With its great, ongoing success, the annual dinner of November 1869 "was a gastronomic event of unprecedented interest. It may be doubted whether such a variety of fresh game could be served in any other city in the world," were the words of an initial report by the Chicago Times.

Suitable edibles could be bought for chefs preparing culinary treats being appreciated by an increasing crowd at the hotel and eatery. There were broiled reed birds — with rice birds also indicated separately — along with meadow larks, plover and black birds. Numerous other sorts of fowl were served by attentive staff, considerate of the day as they worked hard to make the day special for their guests.

These are the game bird sales for the city market, on the day of the dinner.

  • mallard ducks; 15 dozen at $3.00
  • prairie chickens; 15 dozen at $5.25
  • quail; 40 dozen at $2.00
  • teal; 4 dozen dressed at $1.50

Conflagration.

During the great fire in Chicago in October 1871, the proprietor of the Tremont House, as his place was burning, went elsewhere and because of a quick transaction of $1000, the game dinners were then at the Grand Pacific Hotel.Drake's associates in early 1875 were Samuel W. Turner and T.B. Gaskill.

An article indicated: "No stronger combination of hotel men, or one more certain to command the confidence and patronage of the great public could be made in this country, and, taken in connection with the unsurpassed accommodations and appointments of this grand hotel, and the reduction in prices to $3 and $4.50 per day, to meet the times. It is easy to predict for the management a most flattering and substantial success." — Sterling Standard, February

In 1877, the 22nd annual game dinner was an especially prominent social event. "It is always looked for by Chicagoans with special delight," according to a news report in the Wheeling Daily Intelligener; and as also reported in more extent by the St. Johnsbury Caledonian. Messr. Drake, as host, presented a menu with a colorful picture "representing the sportsmen on the plains and among the mountains, taking the various game, from a buffalo down to a squirrel, and from a wild goose to a quail." Consider the grand setting at a prominent hotel in a great city on the lake. Mr. Drake was bustling about. The wait staff were hustling to get things done to accommodate their guests. Wonderful aromas of soon to be eaten delicacies wafted about the eating space. Chatter from the throng at well-attended tables was prevalent, as the folks enjoyed the sociability among appreciated friends and acquaintances. Mr. Drake's dinners were obviously a venue of conviviality. Exudes of gossip spread as tasty tidbits of delectable delight were nibbled by decorative men and women.

"The parlors of the Grand Pacific were thronged by hundreds of the most prominent citizens of Chicago, many of whom were accompanied by friends from New York, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Detroit, Milwaukee and other cities. The dinner was rich and peculiar in having dishes of every kind of American game. The dinner was followed by music and dancing." — Wheeling Daily Intelligencer

Another report indicates the event was "both novel and elegant," with "Fare for a King."

Market prices for some of the menu items is indicated for the November 21, 1877 issue of the Chicago Daily Commercial Report and Market Review.

  • canvas backs, $4.00 @ 4.25 per dozen
  • mallard ducks $1.75 @ 2.00 for good to choice
  • partridge slow at $2.00 @ 2.50 for common to choice Illinois stock
  • prairie chickens at $3.00 @ 3.50 per dozen with some in bad condition selling considerably lower
  • quail dull at 75 c @ $1.00 for fair to choice birds
  • small ducks, $1.00 for good birds
  • teal, $1.25 when fresh and in good order

Luminaries were abundant at the 1878 game dinner at the Grand Pacific Hotel. Once again, the news provides details.

"There were present Senator Booth, of California; Senator Oglesby, Gen. John A. Logan and five hundred other quests, many of them being from abroad. Fifty-seven different kinds of game were served. It was a very fashionable affair, the toilets of the ladies being elegant." — Rock Island Argus

The 1879 menu continued the theme. Atop the list was Soup, then Fish, then Boiled and Roast items. There were then broiled sorts of meat for the late-November event. Mr. Drake, with his experience, once again brought together the essential things to attract a throng of eaters to a phantasmagoria of meats.

These are some of the market prices on the day of the dinner.

  • common small ducks at $1.25 @ 1.50 per dozen
  • mallard ducks firm at $3.00 @ 3.25 per dozen for choice stock
  • partridge; $5.50 @ 6.00 per dozen
  • prairie chickens; sold mostly at $6.00 per dozen, though there were occasional sales at $6.25
  • quail are scarce and wanted, and fancy lots brought $3.25 @ 3.50 per dozen
  • teal at $2.00

The 25th annual dinner was noted to be a "wonderful exhibit of the capabilities of the Chicago market." The entire menu, starting with "Blue Point Oysters in Shell" was published in the newspaper. The event occurred on November 13th.

There are few details for the 1880 event, but these are some of the market, prices.

  • common small ducks; $1.25 @ 1.50 per dozen
  • mallard ducks sell moderately at $1.75 @ 2.00 per dozen for choice
  • partridge are in moderate supply and slow at $5.00 @ 5.50 per dozen
  • prairie chickens are generally held at $6.00 per dozen, but are quite slow at that and have sold at $5.75, and some buyers only bid $5.50
  • quail are in large supply and slow sale at $1.50 per dozen for choice birds, and $1.25 per dozen for only fair, with a downward tendency
  • wild turkeys are selling moderately at 11 c @ 12 1/2 per lb. for fair to choice
  • teal at $1.50 @ 1.75

In 1881, 500 of the 530 invited guests attended.

The 1884 meal was November 22nd.

A different situation occurred in 1886. Items on the menu were "scarce and high," according to an expansive news article. Drake offered "his guests a greater variety of game than is served at any one time elsewhere in America, and perhaps it would not be too much to say any where else in the world. It now takes months to arrange for the providing of game for this grand entertainment and the source of the supply of some of it is even as remote as the Pacific coast; in fact, a great deal of it comes from the vicinity of the Rocky mountains. A fine buffalo calf was fattened up in Dakota."

"Coming as it does, early in November, the game dinner sets the ball in motion, so to put it, and is the grand initiative of the season's gayeties. A full dress affair, handsome new dinner dresses are displayed in their first freshness and 'claw-hammer cutaways' and 'Prince Alberts' have not the tell-tale lateral wrinkles which have fixed themselves at the waist later, when they have acquired that put-on-often look which is all too apparent as the season advances. The dressing at this thirty-first game diner was particularly elaborate and handsome. There was a much larger proportion of both full and demi-trains than there has been for several years, and the number of decollete costumes gave the assembly quite a full-dress English look." ... "at 6:15 o'clock John Hand's orchestra, stationed in the broad approach leading down to the grand dining hall, struck up a bright, inspiring march, and the brilliant concourse of ladies and gentlemen swept along down the whole dancing hall and into the dining room." ... "The groupings at the different tables were admirably arranged for the promotion of sociability, and Mr. Drakes's personal attention to each group and hospitable inquiry as to their being acceptably served, made the occasion one of thorough enjoyment to each individual guest." — St. Paul Sunday Globe
Among the throng were three men ... "who attended the first game dinner at the old Tremont, and with one or two exceptions, have attended every one of the long series. They were Hon. John Wentworth, Philip Wadson and Col. J.J.S. Watson. One John Gabrel, who was head waiter upon the occasion of the first game dinner, and has been in the Mr. Drake's employ from that time until the present, assisted in serving the dinner last night."

Dancing began at 9:30 p.m., with the music played by the John Hand Orchestra: ... "while the younger portion of the assembly tripped the light fantastic toe, the older ones gathered in congenial groups and chatted, while enjoying the music and the spectacle of the gay dancers." The event ended at midnight that Saturday.

At 6 p.m., the meal in the grand banquet hall started. "For months, skilled hunters have been scouring the forests of northern Michigan and Wisconsin in search of the specialties which will grace the table," according to a news article. Six hundred people would attend. The social event had an impressive roster of attendees.

Many "distinguished guests" were invited to the 1887 game banquet , which included seventy dishes. The chefs in the kitchen were certainly busy cooking and making certain that the food was appropriately prepared and those items which needed to be hot, were served in an appropriate manner. "The roasts occupy a space of twenty-seven lines and broils some twenty more." according to a news article.

The "distinguished company of guests" included "Walker and Emmons Blaine, U.S. Senator Chas. Farwell, Hon. J.F. Cramer, of Milwaukee; Hon. Robt. T. Lincoln,, Bishop McLaren, J.W. Potter, of Omaha, Col. H.G. Parker, of Boston; Hon. Martin I. Townsend, of New York; Gen. Robt. Williams U.S.A.; P.P. Wright of Cleveland; J.H. Allen, of New York; President Blake of the board of trade, A.C. Bird, of Milwaukee; George R. Blanchard, R.R. Cable, Gen. John B. Carson, A.N.H. Carpenter, Col. F.F. Barr, U.S.A., Gen. S.K. Dawson, of Pittsburgh, Judge Gresham, Albert Keep, President, H.B. Ledyard of the Michigan Central, Detroit; Joseph Medill, Major Roche, Roswell Miller, John Newell, of Lake Shore, and some five hundred others. Places of honor will be reserved for Hon. John Wentworth, Col. Wilson, Col. J. Mason Loomis and Phillip Wadsworth, four veterans who have sat down to dinner since the initial one. The banqueting hall was magnificently decorated this morning, and as the invitations include the wives of the guests, the scene when the company in full dress is seated under the gas light will be as brilliant as the event will be memorable." — Sedalia Weekly Bazoo

Imagine the unending chatter. Consider the sundry sounds of busy servers. Realize how Mr. Burke and his associates had to scurry about, giving attention to appreciated guests. Once more.

The legacy would eventually end. News reports indicate that the game dinner ended in 1894, one reason being that game animals were difficult to obtain. It may have also been because Mr. Burke was older, with his obituary written in November 1895. What he did meant so much to so many people. Thankfully, this heritage can be appreciated, decades later.

Unique History

The many game dinners are unique in the annals of history, and contribute a distinctive perspective associated with eaten birds and other edibles.

Oysters were always the first item given on the menu. Desserts were at the bottom as indicated by the following summary of the available menus. It presents an overall perspective of what the hundreds of people ate at the wonderful dinners prepared by Mr. John B. Drake and associates. Consider the variety!

Menu.
Menu Item 1858 1866 1869 1877 1879 1880 1884 1886 1889
Blue Points - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Blue-point Oysters in Shell - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Oysters on Shell - - - - - - * * - - - - * * - - - -
Green Turtle Steak, Burgundy Sauce - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Oyster Patties - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Soup.
Bouillon Soup - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Consomme of Prairie Chicken - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * *
Game Broth - - - - - - * * - - * * * * * * - -
Hunter Soup - - - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - -
Venison a la Chasseur - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * *
Venison Broth - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Venison, Hunter Style - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Consomme of Grouse - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Fish.
Baked Black Bass, Claret Sauce - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Baked Red Snapper - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Baked Red Snapper, Port Wine Sauce - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Baked White Fish, Port Wine Sauce - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * *
Black Bass - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Boiled Sheep's Head - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Boiled Trout, Lobster Sauce - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * *
Boiled Trout, Shrimp Sauce - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Boiled Whitefish, Maitre d'Hotel - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Broiled Red Snapper - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Broiled Whitefish - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Brook Trout - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Boiled.
Black Bear - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Black Tail Deer - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Blue Wing Teal - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Buffalo Steak - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Buffalo Tongue - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Cinnamon Bear - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
English Hare - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * * *
Gray Squirrel - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Jack Rabbit - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Leg of Elk - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Leg of Mountain Sheep - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Mountain Sheep - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Opossum - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Rabbits - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Saddle of Venison - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Venison Steak - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Black Birds - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Buffalo Tongue - - - - - - - - * * - - * * * * - -
Butter Ball Duck - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
English Hare - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
English Snipe - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Ham of Bear - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - -
Ham of Black Bear - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - - - -
Jack Snipe - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Leg of Mountain Sheep - - - - - - - - * * - - * * * * * *
Marsh Birds - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Partridge - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Pheasants - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Plover - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Quails - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Red Wing Starling - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Reed Birds - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Rice Birds - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Venison Tongue - - - - - - - - * * - - - - * * - -
Wild Turkey - - - - - - * * - - - - * * - - * *
Roast.
Antelope - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Black Bear - - * * * * * * - - - - * * - - * *
Black-tail Deer - - - - * * - - - - - - * * - - * *
Blue Wing Teal - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Brant - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Buffalo - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Canvas Back Duck - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Cinnamon Bear - - - - * * - - - - - - * * - - * *
Coon - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - - * *
Elk - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Jack Rabbit - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - * *
Leg of Elk - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - * *
Leg of Venison - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - * *
Loin of Buffalo - - - - - - * * * * * * * * * * - -
Loin of Moose - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Mallard Duck - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Moose - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Mountain Bison - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Mountain Sheep - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - * *
Opossum - - - - * * * * * * * * * * - - - -
Partridge - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Pheasants - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Prairie Chicken - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Quails - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Raccoon - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Red Deer - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Red Head Duck - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Saddle of Antelope - - - - - - * * * * - - * * - - * *
Saddle of Black-tail Deer - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - * *
Saddle of Mountain Sheep - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Saddle Venison - - * * * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Sand Hill Crane - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Spotted Grouse - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Striped Squirrel - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Widgeon - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Wild Geese - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Wild Turkey - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Wood Duck - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Woodchuck - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - - - -
Broiled.
American Coot - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
American Widgeon - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Arctic Grouse - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Black Duck - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Blue Grouse - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * *
Blue-bill Widgeon - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Blue-winged Teal - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Brandt - - - - * * - - - - - - * * - - - -
Brant - - * * - - - - * * * * - - - - * *
Butter-ball Duck - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Canada Goose - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Canvas-back Duck - - * * * * * * * * * * * * - - * *
Carolina Dove - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Cedar Hen - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Cormorant Duck - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Dusky Duck - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Gadwall Duck - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Golden Plover - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Gray Duck - - - - * * - - - - * * - - - - - -
Green-winged Teal - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - - - -
Grey Duck * * * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Hooded Merganser Duck - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Killdeer Plover - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Lake Duck - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Laughing Goose - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Long-tail Duck - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Mallard Duck * * * * * * - - * * * * * * - - - -
Partridge - - * * - - - - * * * * * * - - * *
Pheasant - - - - - - - - * * * * * * - - * *
Pin-tail Duck - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Pin-tail Grouse - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Plover - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * *
Prairie Chicken * * * * * * * * * * * * * * - - - -
Quail - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - - - -
Red Head Duck - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Red-bill Merganser Duck - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Red-head Duck - - * * - - * * * * * * * * - - * *
Red-necked Grebe - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Ring-necked Duck - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Ruddy Duck - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Ruffed Grouse - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - * *
Sage Hen - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - * *
Sand-hill Crane * * * * * * - - - - * * * * - - - -
Scaup Duck - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Shovel-bill Duck - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Shoveler Duck - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Spike Tails - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Spotted Grouse - - - - - - * * - - - - * * - - * *
Spruce Grouse - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Teal Duck - - * * * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Virginia Partridge - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Widgeon * * - - * * - - - - - - * * - - * *
Wild Goose * * * * * * * * - - * * * * - - * *
Wild Pigeon * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Wild Turkey - - * * * * * * * * * * * * - - * *
Wilson Snipe - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Wood Duck * * * * * * - - * * * * * * - - * *
Yellow-leg Plover - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
American Rabbit - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Antelope Steaks - - - - * * - - - - - - * * - - - -
Black Squirrel - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Buffalo Steak - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Elk Steaks - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Fox Squirrel - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - - - -
Gray Rabbit - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Gray Squirrel - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Rabbit - - * * * * - - - - - - * * - - - -
Red Squirrel - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Squirrels * * * * * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Venison Steaks - - * * * * - - - - - - * * - - - -
Blackbirds - - - - * * - - - - * * * * - - - -
Blue-winged Teal * * * * * * - - - - - - * * - - - -
Buffle-headed Duck - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Butter-ball Duck - - * * * * - - * * * * * * - - - -
Curlew - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Dunlin Sandpiper - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
English Snipe - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Golden Plover - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Gray Snipe - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Jack Snipe - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Least Sandpiper - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Marsh Birds * * - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Meadow Larks - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Partridge - - - - - - * * - - - - * * - - - -
Pheasant - - - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - -
Plover * * * * * * * * - - - - * * - - - -
Prairie Chicken * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Quail - - * * * * * * * * * * * * - - - -
Rail - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Red-winged Starling - - - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - -
Reed Birds * * - - * * * * * * * * * * - - - -
Rice Birds - - - - * * - - * * * * * * - - - -
Sand Peep - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Sand Snipe - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Shovel-bill Duck - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Snipe - - * * * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Wild Pigeon * * - - * * - - - - - - - - - - - -
Wood Cock with Toast and Pork * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Vegetables.
Baked Mashed Potatoes - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Baked Sweet Potatoes - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Boiled and Mashed Potatoes - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - -
Boiled Potatoes - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Celery - - - - - - * * * * * * * * * * - -
Chocolate Macaroons - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Dressed Celery - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Dressed Lettuce - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - -
English Cheese - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Frogs Fried and Breaded * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Frogs Fried in Crumbs - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Game Pies with Olives * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Green Peas - - - - - - * * * * - - * * * * - -
Hashed Grouse with Poached Eggs * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Lettuce - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Lima Beans - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Mashed Potatoes - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Onions - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Plain Potatoes - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - - - -
Potted Prairie Chickens a la Borgouise * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Spinach - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - -
Squirrels, Stewed and in Champagne * * - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Stewed Tomatoes - - - - - - - - * * - - * * * * - -
Succotash - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Sweet Corn - - - - - - * * * * * * * * * * - -
Sweet Potatoes - - - - - - - - * * - - - - * * - -
Sweet Tomatoes - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Turnips - - - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - -
Entrees.
Antelope Steak, Mushroom Sauce - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Buffalo Steak, Mushroom Sauce - - - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - -
Buffalo Steak, with Jelly - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Elk, Braise, Jelly Sauce - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
English Hare, with Dumplings - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Escaloped Oysters - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Filet of Grouse aux Truffles - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Fillet of Grouse with Truffles - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Fricassee of Rabbit, aux Champignone - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Frogs, Fried, Camp Style - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Oyster Pie - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - -
Rabbit Braise, Cream Sauce - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Rabbit Braise, Sauce Burgundy - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Ragout of Bear, Hunter Style - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Ragout of Squirrel - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Salmi of Game, with Olives - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Salmi of Grouse, Port Wine Sauce - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Squirrel, Braise, Sauce Diable - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Squirrel, Saute, Port Wine Sauce - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Stewed Terrapin, en Caises - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Stewed Venison, Hunter Style - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Venison Cutlet, Jelly Sauce - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - -
Venison Pie, Hunter Style - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Wild Pigeon Compots - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Dressed Celery - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Salads.
Lobster - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Lobster Salad - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Mayonnaise of Chicken - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Potato - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Prairie Chicken - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Shrimp - - - - - - * * - - - - - - * * - -
Shrimp Salad - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - -
Assorted Fancy Cake - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Champagne Jelly in Glasses - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Cocoanut Cakes - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Confectionary - - - - - - * * - - * * - - - - - -
Corne d'Abondance - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Fruit Baskets, au Nougat - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Macaroons - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Meringuse, a la Creme - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Pyramids - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Desserts.
Almond Fancy Cake - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Apples - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Biscuit - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - -
Bon-Bons - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Bon-bons, Assorted - - - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - -
Brandy Drops, Ornamental Pyramid - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
California Grapes - - - - - - * * - - * * * * - - - -
California Plums - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Candied Fruit - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Candy Pyramid - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Catawba Grapes - - - - - - * * * * - - * * - - - -
Chantilly Cream, a la Printaniere - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Charlotte Russe - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Cheese - - - - - - - - - - * * * * * * - -
Chocolate a la Creme - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Chocolate Eclairs - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Coffee - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Concord Grapes - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Diana Grapes - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Fancy Almond Cake - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Fancy Cakes - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Figs - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Fruit - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Jamaica Sorbet - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Kisses - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - -
Malaga Grapes - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Muscat Grapes - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Neapolitan Ice Cream - - - - - - * * - - * * - - * * - -
Nougat Pyramids - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Nuts - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Oranges - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Pears - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - - - -
Pudding a la Margarine - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - -
Raisins - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Sage Cheese - - - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - -
Tokey Grapes - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - - - -
Tutti Frutti Ice Cream - - - - - - - - - - - - * * - - - -
Vanilla Ice Cream - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Wine Jelly - - - - - - - - - - * * * * - - - -
Fountain - - - - - - * * - - - - - - - - - -
Roman Punch - - - - - - * * * * * * * * - - - -
Coffee - - - - - - * * * * * * - - - - - -
Bon-Bons and Flowers.
This summary uses astericks (* *) to indicate the overall variety of items on the several menus reviewed. Some slight changes have been made to some of the items to deal with alternative spellings, variable presentations given when printed and to combine groupings. Items are listed by group and then in an alphabetic order, though they were not listed in articles or menus in this manner. The intent is to convey an overall list, but, of course, the particular details can only be known by looking at the original source.

Visual Delights.

In addition to edibles, there were other game animal presentations during the years. They were noted as "Cold Ornamental Dishes" or "The Pride of the Forest" another year.

Some of the terms used here might need an interpretation by a gastronomic expert, as what does "galantine" indicate. Or "en Socle" as attributed to quail in the city, etc. as conveyed on the menu of the year, conveyed once and again.

Ornamental Item 1877 1879 1880 1884 1886
Blackbird in Plumage * * - - - - - - - -
Blackbirds in Play - - - - - - * * - -
Boned Duck, au Natural - - - - - - - - * *
Boned Ducks in Feather - - - - * * - - - -
Boned Partridge in Feather * * - - - - - - - -
Boned Quail in Plumage - - * * - - * * * *
Boned Snipe, with Truffles - - * * * * - - - -
Deer at the Last Moments - - - - - - * * - -
Duck, Truffe, on Socle * * - - - - - - - -
Fox Squirrel * * - - - - - - - -
Fox Squirrel au Naturel - - - - * * - - - -
Fox Squirrel in Arbor - - * * - - - - - -
Galantine of Grouse * * - - - - - - - -
Galantine of Turkey - - * * - - - - - -
Lobster Salad, Garnished - - * * - - - - - -
Partridge in Feather - - * * - - - - - -
Partridge in Nest - - - - - - * * - -
Partridge in Plumage - - - - * * - - - -
Partridge on Nest - - - - - - - - * *
Pattie of Liver, en Bellevue - - * * - - - - - -
Prairie Chicken on Socle - - * * - - - - * *
Prairie Chicken, au Naturel * * - - - - - - - -
Prairie Chickens in Nest - - - - * * - - - -
Pyramid of Game en Bellevue - - - - - - * * * *
Pyramid of Wild Goose Liver in Jelly - - - - - - * * * *
Quail en Socle - - - - * * - - - -
Quail in Plumage * * - - - - - - - -
Rabbit on Watch - - - - - - * * - -
Red Wing Starling on Tree - - - - - - - - * *
Red-wing Starling on Tree - - - - - - * * - -
Red-wing Starling, au Naturel - - * * - - - - - -
Red-winged Starling en Arbor - - - - * * - - - -
Roast Hare on Soole * * - - - - - - - -
Sand-hill Crane in Marsh - - - - * * - - - -
Snipe in Marsh * * - - - - - - - -
Stuffed Coon, au Naturel * * - - - - - - - -
The Coon at Home - - - - - - * * - -
The Coon on Watch - - - - * * - - - -
The Coon Out at Night - - - - - - - - * *
The Happy Family - - - - * * - - - -
The Hunter at Home - - - - * * - - - -
The Ranch Cottage - - - - * * - - - -
Wild Turkey, en Nid * * - - - - - - - -
Woodchuck Sunning - - - - * * - - - -

This is certainly a preeminent legacy for Chicago, and unsurpassed in the chronicles as associated with wild birds. The meals were certainly a wonderful wonderment.